15 Responsive Email Design Tips

Sending attractive marketing and business emails can be hard. You are required to find the correct words to say, and you also need to find how to address them.

Responsible email design requires both a creative eye and a practical eye. Emails should also be personalized so that the reader feels a connection to the brand. It makes your brand to be unique and generates more audience.

In this article, we will discuss the fifteen responsive email design tips.

15 Responsible Email Design Tips

We have listed fifteen different responsible email design tips. You can use these tips for your brand’s marketing purposes.

Think Mobile First

Responsive Email Design Tips : Think Mobile First

The number of emails opened on mobile has increased a lot in recent years — which means if your emails aren’t perfected for the mobile platform, you’re neglecting the majority of your email receivers.

So think about a mobile-first mentality when it comes to email design. Most email clients now spontaneously adjust email layouts for mobile devices, but some still don’t.

Make sure your emails are perceptive by using supple templates, cascading style sheet (CSS) code, and layouts for responsive email design tips. 

When feasible, stick to a single-column layout and never use more than three columns. Make fonts and calls-to-action large, clear, and easy to click on.

And test your emails on various email clients and devices to make sure they’re rendering correctly.

Use an Email Width of 600 Pixels

You exactly don’t know what email client your recipients might be using — which means you have to design for the lowest common denominator when it comes to email width.

For the best clarity, keep your emails around 600 pixels wide. This will make sure your marketing emails are viewable in the vertical preview pane of any email client.

Avoid Background Images

Many email clients don’t incorporate background images, so you should use them at your own risk.

If you have to use a background image, you should include it, make sure it doesn’t include important information or imagery, and use a solid background color as a fallback.

Balance Text and Images

Background images aren’t the only images that sometimes fail to load. Moreover, many email clients block all images altogether.

Not only that, image-heavy emails are flagged as spam — meaning your clients will not be able to see your business emails.

To solve these issues, balance out images and text if you want images to catch the reader’s eye and to tell your story quicker than any traditional text.

You should make sure you still tell your ideas. In addition to the body, provide alt text for each image you use.

Format Images Correctly

You should include alt text and background colors for images in your marketing emails. 

Here are a few other image formatting tips to keep in mind for optimal email design. They are as follow:

Optimization of image size. 

The larger the image, the longer it takes the email to load. You should keep images as small as possible without minimizing the quality.

Declare image width and height.

Please specify the exact size of your images. This will help your email maintain its structure when images fail to open. 

Use absolute URLs for image locations. 

Use only absolute URLs for all your emails, and deploy them on your website. Absolute URLs are far better than relative URLs for many reasons. 

Avoid using PNG files. 

There are email clients that support PNGs. So you should use JPGs file format instead.

Don’t use videos. 

JavaScript and flash may take forever to load, and they often send your email straight to spam.

If you have a video you want to share, use a still image that links to a page containing the video rather than embedding the video within the email itself. (That said, consider using GIFs to boost engagement.)

Eye-Catching Header

If you are forwarding a plain text email, keep it simple. But if you aren’t, you want to design a simple yet beautiful-looking header at the top of your email.

The top left corner is the most important land of your all email. It’s where your reader’s eye will go first.

You can use it well by placing your company’s logo there, with other relevant information like your phone number on the right.

Make sure your header fits with the full width of the email. Don’t cram too much into your header. It would be best if you tried to keep it below 150 pixels.

You should also use a navigation bar if multiple products or categories to show.

Put Key Information “Above the Fold”

In journalism, “above the fold” means the front-cover story. The first one, your readers, get to see.

If you want readers to keep reading your content, you should put your most important content at the top of the email. The best place is within the first few inches of email.

You should make use of the left side of the email. Eye-tracking software has shown that people spend the longest on the left-hand side of the screen, so keep that in mind when placing important content.

Keep Body Copy Simple

When writing your email, you should make your content easy to read. That means paragraphs and short sentences, ample white space, and formatting cues like bullet points and bolded text.

If you have many contents to include, you should consider using a table of contents with links to the sections so that readers can easily jump to the content they might want to read.

But, don’t try to include too much text part; not only will that distract readers, but it’s also an indicator of spam emails.

In the end, you should include an email signature. This will also add a personal touch. Readers can then contact if they have queries or feedback.

Add Social Sharing Buttons

15 Responsive Email Design Tips

One of the bad mistakes you could make in your email marketing campaigns is neglecting to provide social media sharing buttons.

Your top goal as a digital marketer is to gain brand evangelists. What could be better for your organization than making customers share your ideas on their social media accounts?

Include social media buttons at the bottom of all your business emails. If asking your readers to share the email content seems too aggressive or unrealistic, asking them to press the “Follow” button also works. 

The footer is one of the most important elements of your business emails.

The footer is basically about covering your interest. First off, all marketing emails need to follow the CAN-SPAM Act, which requires that you provide an opt-out link and your company’s name and physical address in every email you send. You also need to let recipients explain why they are receiving this email.

It would be best to make it easy for your clients to unsubscribe to the emails they are receiving. If you don’t, they’ll become even more turned off by your business.

The footer of an email is also a very good place to put other contact information, subscription preferences, and links to important pages on your website (such as your new inventory, store locator, or calendar of events).

Once your email is completed, make sure you enable a web version for those who can’t view the email in their email client.

Be sure to include plain text as well. Many email programs can draft that for you, but you’ll want to go in and edit it so that all the funky program from the HTML performance is replaced or removed. Don’t change the code and don’t copy too much, or it’ll trigger spam filters.

Consider the Programming

15 Responsive Email Design Tips

Speaking of program, there are a few things you should be careful while designing an email:

border-color

float

background-image

@font-face

max-width

Those programs won’t display in certain email clients, so you may want to avoid them.

In a general context, try to avoid CSS in your emails as much as possible because several major email services remove CSS from your email’s body section and head sections. Instead, you can use inline CSS and keep it simple.

Design for Simplicity

Above all, simple email templates should be used. They are easier for readers to read and digest. They’re also easier for email clients to read, skim and digest.

Program structures using tables to ensure your email design displays correctly across all email clients.

You should Specify the cell width and use nested tables rather than margins and padding for more complicated layouts.

Test, Test, Test!

Finally, to truly find the right recipe for your business email design, you must test it.

Before conveying an email, send test versions to yourself and your team to see how it is displayed in many different email clients and check whether it ends up in the spam folder.

It would be best if you also ran tests after the send. No two email guides are the same — just like no two readers are identical.

Divide your list and test variations of your marketing emails to determine your best delivery times, CTA placement, and more.

Use Big, Basic Fonts

When choosing a font for your marketing/business emails, use standard system fonts, such as Arial, Helvetica, Times New Roman, Verdana Georgia, and Tahoma.

Certain email clients may not accompany other fonts, so they may not display correctly unless you set a fallback web-safe font.

Font size is essential for email readability. The minimum suggestion font size is 14 pixels for the body and 22 pixels for headings.

Conclusion

You are required to find the correct words to say, and you also need to find how to address them. Responsible email design requires both a creative eye and a practical eye.

Most email clients now spontaneously adjust email layouts for mobile devices, but some still don’t. Make sure your emails are perceptive by using supple templates, cascading style sheet (CSS) code, and layouts.

When feasible, stick to a single-column layout and never use more than three columns. And test your emails on various email clients and devices to make sure they’re rendering correctly. For the best clarity, keep your emails around 600 pixels wide.

Background images aren’t the only images that sometimes fail to load. If you want images to catch the reader’s eye and tell your story quicker than any traditional text.

You should make sure you still tell your ideas. You should include alt text and background colors for images in your marketing emails.

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